Posts Tagged ‘violence

05
Sep
10

Story 031: The Highlanders

Jamie (right) captures the Doctor and Polly

After a summer hiatus (at this rate, I’ll never make it through all 26 classic seasons), I picked up the Doctor where I left off. Patrick Troughton’s second story. I was rather ambivalent about Troughton’s Doctor after The Power of the Daleks, and this story didn’t do too much to make me like him more. In fact, I found his somewhat childish nature to be irritating. Perhaps I just haven’t gotten in tune with his interpretation of the role. And not being able to actually see Troughton in action (nothing but reproductions so far) probably hasn’t helped.

The travelers arrive in Scotland in 1746, shortly after the end of the Battle of Culloden. We see a difference in this Doctor from William Hartnell right away as he apparently recognizes their location and is ready to go. Ben, on the other hand, is convinced that they are in England and wants to find out what the deal is. This harkens back to the time that Ian was convinced the France during the Reign of Terror was home and went off in search of a pub to buy the Doctor a beer. Instead, they end up being taken prisoner first by a group of rebels and then by the British army.

Among the group of highlanders that befriend our heroes is Jamie McCrimmon. He seems like a decent enough fellow, perhaps a bit like Ben. He was certainly introduced in a manner similar to Ben in that he was a major player in the adventure. At the end of the Story he ends up agreeing to travel with the Doctor, although he doesn’t know quite what’s going on. At this point, I have a comment on Ben. I was a Ben fan. I liked his chutzpah. But he almost seemed out of control in this story, acting foolish. Tearing up his contract, refusing to go with the other prisoners, insisting the army had no right to arrest him. It is this bit of recklessness that made him appealing to me, but he just made the situation worse.

At any rate, the Doctor, pretending to be German, Ben, Jamie, and the Laird (a Scottish Lord, I’m assuming?) are taken prisoner by Grey and Trask, illegally being sold into slavery. Polly and her friend Kirsty, though, elude capture. They hide out in a pit and use their feminine wiles to blackmail Ffinch, and army officer, into helping them. He helps them to reunite with the Doctor. Meanwhile, Ben is busy ripping up his slavery contract and being tossed overboard of the Annabelle slave ship. He manages to get loose of his ties in the water and swim to short where, luckily, the Doctor is conveniently waiting. The plan they come up with is fine: the girls give weapons to the prisoners while the Doctor distracts them. After a battle, Trask ends up in the drink, and the rebels sail the ship away to France. Jamie, however, is left behind as he helps the travelers to locate the TARDIS. After avoiding capture with the help of Ffinch (still feeling blackmailed, I suppose), the TARDIS is found. Jamie isn’t sure where he’s going to go, so Polly and Ben suggest he accompany them. He does, although he seems nervous about it.

I’m told by the Wikipedia that this is the last historical story for many years, owing to Patrick Troughton’s desire to differentiate his Doctor from that of William Hartnell. I’m a little sad to see the historicals go, I rather like them. Having said that, I was kind of bored by this story. For almost half of the story, each traveler was in a different location. This made interaction between them a bit sparse and, as is typical, the secondary cast weren’t much to write home about. Trask was like a cartoon pirate, and Ffinch was a wimp. Jamie seems alright, but was not really developed. I think that Polly’s part of the story was the most intriguing, with her cliffhanger in the pit and the blackmail of Ffinch. And then, when the plot to rescue the rebels was hatched I was impressed by her (and Kirsty’s) insistence upon being a major player in the events. Polly really took charge of her role in this adventure, while the Doctor was rather irritating and Ben was foolish. She was almost Barbaraesque, but much less old. Speaking of Barbara, I’m starting to appreciate her more.

Overall, the story was ho-hum. Much of the energy that was driving the show in Season 3 seems to have been lost somewhere. Or been redirected somehow. The next story has an existing episode, so seeing Troughton and Jamie in action may help enliven it some. I hope so, because I kept having to rewind after dozing off while watching this one.

Advertisements
11
May
10

Story 028: The Smugglers

The Smugglers was so boring. I kept falling asleep and didn’t even want to finish it. The plot structure seemed to be something out of season 1 or 2, although the violence of season 3 was still evident. And it featured a hunt for some booty.

The Wikipedia tells me that the story was filmed with Season 3, but intended to hold over until Season 4. It was a historical story, probably supposed to contrast with the futuristic, yet present-tense war machines. It is William Hartnell’s next-to-last story, and his last complete story. He played it well and Ben and Polly weren’t too bad. I guess there was nothing wrong with the story…it just wasn’t interesting.

Never Trust a Pirate!

The travelers arrive on the beach of Cornwall. Ben and Polly are skeptical that they have traveled through time, as one might expect. Ben is worried (and whining) about making it back to his Navy ship for deployment. They wander the cliffs and come to a church. The churchwarden (I’m guessing that’s some sort of caretaker?) gets some medical attention from the Doctor and tells him a cryptic secret: Ringwood, Smallbeer, and Gurney. The travelers leave and soe pirates, led by Pike and his crony Cherub, show up demanding to know the location of the booty (booty is a much more piratey word than treasure….). When the warden doesn’t tell them, they kill him and go in search of the travelers.

This is where the season 1 and 2 structure comes in….Ben and Polly are arrested and held in one place while the Doctor is captured by Pike and held in another. It made me think of The Daleks or the story where Barbara and Susan were in jail (I forget the exact story). I’m sure that this motif continues to appear regularly, but there was no particularly interesting twist to this. It just seemed a bland step backward from Season 3.

Pike begins working with the greedy Squire to try to find out the location of the Booty. Cherub refers to the Doctor as Sawbones a lot, Pike betrays the squire, wounding him, and also betrays Cherub, killing him. It just goes to show that you can’t trust a pirate. And I won’t get into the incredibly racist portrayal of Jamaica, a black pirate. I’ll just let the image say it all:

Dis Booty sho am good, massah!

Some army types show up, there’s a great sword battle that I couldn’t see because all episodes of this story are missing. They find the Booty, but the army types kill Pike. I’m not sure what happens to the Booty because the travelers sneak off to the TARDIS and make a break for it.

Ben and Polly, in their first official story as companions, weren’t too shabby. Ben showed some guts, which I expected since that’s how he was set up in his previous story. And, besides, we can’t exactly portray a member of the Royal Navy as a wimp, can we? I feel like I got a decent feel for their characters. Polly is strong, but definitely a background-lurker. Ben likes to take charge and is quick to fight. I could see almost an Ian and Barbara relationship with the doctor developing…but since the Doctor will soon no longer be the same Doctor, I’m guessing that we won’t really see it develop that way.

In short, this story wasn’t terrible. I just didn’t like it. Maybe I just don’t like pirates. Or maybe I don’t find hidden Booty a very good plot device. I don’t know. The Wikipedia informs me that this was the least watched story for twenty years, averaging around 4.6 million viewers. And I think that it is still the second-least watched story of all time. Worse than The Gunfighters! So it can’t just be me. And as a Season Premier? It should have top ratings. Lame. I’m looking forward the the Doctor’s switch over in the next story, though. It’s GOT to pick up for that, right?

Booty count: 8

21
Mar
10

Story 025: The Gunfighters

The Doctor meets The Law

I did not know until after watching The Gunfighters that this story is supposedly one of the worst of all time. Apparently, it had a rather small viewing audience and some reviewer from back in the day called it a terrible story. The evaluation stuck. Had I known this before watching, I probably would have watched it differently. As it went, though, I don’t think the story was too bad. It’s not particularly good, but it’s entertaining and does not deserve the awful reputation it has been given.

The travelers arrive in 1881 Tombstone, Arizona, home of the most famous gunfight of all time. The Doctor has a toothache and walks into the shop of dentist Doc Holliday. Holliday actually was a dentist, although I don’t know if he ever had an office in Tombstone. Many Doc/Doctor gags ensue and are occasionally funny. More funny is the Doctor himself. Hartnell, throughout the story, plays a very subtle comedian, repeatedly referring to Wyatt Earp as Mr. Werp and introducing himself as Dr. Caligari (“Doctor who?” “Ah, yes, quite right.”).¬† Steven and Dodo manage to find some ridiculous early-Hollywood-style Western costumes in the TARDIS closet and take on the role of traveling musicians.

Dodo Oakley

It turns out that Holliday is being hunted by the Clanton brothers for killing another brother. He is good friends with Earp and Bat Masterson, the law in town. Of course, Wyatt Earp was not sheriff of Tombstone and Bat Masterson was not around when the gunfight at the OK Corral took place. I found it interesting that they chose to place Bat Masterson into the story at all, I wonder if maybe he was a famous cowboy in 1960s England, perhaps the television show Bat Masterson from the early sixties was popular there….

The Clantons take Steven and Dodo hostage after they confuse the Doctor for Doc. Holliday is a slimy bastard, giving the Doctor his gun. Why the Doctor didn’t realize he was being set up, I’m not sure, but he refers to Holliday as his friend throughout the story. Steven is eventually taken hostage by the Clantons and their hired gun, Johnny Ringo (who also played no role in the actual gunfight). In the meantime, Dodo leaves town with Holliday and his girlfriend Kate. She also seems to be quite taken with Holliday, acting as his friend much like the Doctor. I think this relationship was set up because Holliday, despite being slimy, was a pleasant man and was a good comic foil.

Steven Mix

In the end, Steven makes it back, Holliday returns with Dodo (whoforces him at gunpoint and seems quite proud  of herself. She gives a little jig and waves her hand when they arrive back in Tombstone. It was actually somewhat endearing.

In a jail break, the Clantons shoot Werp’s younger brother Warren. Werp and his newly-arrived other brother Virgil (who actually was the marshal in Tombstone) want revenge, challenging the Clantons to a showdown at the OK Corral at dawn. It ends with the Clantons dead, and the travelers are able to slip away and escape in the TARDIS.

Doc the Dentist

I’ve already the mentioned the humor as a high point of this story. Adding to the humor was the atrocious fake American accents. It was difficult to decide if this was a real attempt at making a Western or complete parody of the genre. I’m leaning toward parody because if that’s the case, it was played brilliantly. Werp and Masterson played it straight while Holliday did not. And the Clantons were pretty typical Western villains. Despite the horrible accents, the Clantons and Werp/Masterson actually put on performances that I would classify as pretty typical of 50s/60s American TV westerns like Gunsmoke or The Rifleman. Slightly more absurd and over-the-top than the later Westerns, as would be expected. So, the mix of comedy and accurate copy made for a well-constructed parody.

Now, for the low point. In fact, it was so low that I almost wanted to stop watching. I’m glad I had headphones so someone else on the train didn’t smash my computer. I’m sure anyone familiar with story already knows what’s coming: The Ballad of the Last Chance Saloon. It was funny when Steven sang it with Dodo playing a ragtime piano. All that was missing from the scene was for the Clantons to shoot the floor and tell Steven to dance. But, the slow, dying noises of the lady that sang it about 40 times per episode were enough to drive me insane. It was enough to drop the story from enjoyable to merely entertaining. It could definitely be a reason for the story’s historically low ratings. But it’s not bad enough to make The Gunfighters the worst story ever (The Chase and Edge of Destruction are both worse, and I’m not even through the Hartnell years). Just the song was incredibly painful.

The Werps

Lastly, the focus on the Doctor’s distaste for violence continued a theme that has been going on for a few stories. In this one, he is practically afraid of handling a gun and is distinctly against the gunfight, even though he had been deputized by Werp. Yet, the humans cannot help bu be violent. They can’t stop themselves from killing one another, as even this lighthearted story ends with dead bodies. Violence has definitely been a theme throughout Season 3 and I’m starting to wonder how the Doctor’s attitude toward violence continues as we move through different Doctors starting not too long from now.

28
Feb
10

Story 022: The Massacre (of St. Bartholomew’s Eve)

The Winter of 1965-66 was a depressing time to be a Doctor Who companion. Fresh off the death and destruction of the Daleks’ Master Plan, The Massacre (sometimes called The Massacre of St. Bartholomew’s Eve) returns us to France for the first time since the Season 1 finale just in time for the slaughter of thousands of Protestants. It’s pretty typical Who fare until the final episode when the Doctor figures out exactly what’s about to happen (and even then it doesn’t stray too far).

Dressed to Kill!

Likely not yet recovered from events on Kembel, the Doctor and Steven land in 16th century Paris, with the TARDIS conveniently hidden behind a wall in an alley. They change into some period clothing, although I was disappointed that the Doctor didn’t wear his sweet hat from Reign of Terror. I also noticed later when we saw a close-up of the Doctor’s walking stick that he is no longer carrying the one given to him by The Kahn. I wonder happened to that one…

The Doctor is extremely excited to go and meet an apothecary in the city somewhere and leaves Steven on his own. Other than his conversation with the apothecary we don’t see the Doctor again until the second half of the final episode. I would say he was on vacation, but we do see Hartnell acting as the Abbott. At any rate, this story’s focus is on Steven’s quest to find the Doctor. Due to Hartnell’s double role, there is some suspense over the Abbott’s identity, which is really the most interesting part of the time in France. Of course, the Doctor is not the Abbott, just a doppleganger.

Steven befriends Nicholas and Gaston, two Huguenots (French Protestants) during a bitter feud with the Catholic monarchy. Gaston is employed by Prince Henri, just married to the Catholic Princess Marguerite. The story’s plot revolves around the mysterious identity/assassination of the Sea Beggar and the tension between the opposed religious camps. The Sea Beggar turns out to be the Admiral, the top Protestant in the government. The Abbot has arranged his assassination. These characters are predictably forgettable. In fact, a couple of days went by between watching the second and third episode and I had some trouble telling them apart.

In the meantime, Steven has come under the suspicion of his new friends. When the Doctor does not return they being to think he may be working as a spy for the Catholics. A trip to the Apothecary’s does not pan out and matters are not helped when Anne Chaplet, the Abbott’s servant girl, arrives. Steven and Anne eventually flee, visit the Abbott and learn of the assassination plot.. They attempt to warn Gaston, but have to flee again, going into hiding at the Apothecary’s.

Meanwhile, the assassination fails and the Abbott is blamed and killed. Steven, still thinking that the Abbott is the Doctor visits the body, but is chased back to the Apothecary. Reunited with Anne he begins to despair. Fearing the Doctor is dead and with no way to get into the TARDIS he’s not sure what to do next. At this point the Doctor appears. There is no explanation of where he was. If he wasn’t the Abbott, what was he up to? This is a pretty major plot point that isn’t explained. It bothered me a bit, but more on a sidenote humorous wtf? way than in any negative way.

At any rate, when Anne tells him the date and the year he realizes that the Protestants are about to be slaughtered and says that he and Steven must leave immediately. He tells Anne to go to her Aunt’s house. After a tense sprint, Steven and the Doctor get out just in time.

This is one of the increasingly rare educational episodes. And I learned something! I’ve seen references to the Huguenots often but have never bothered to find out exactly who they were. Now I know! French Protestant that were slaughtered in the 16th century by the Catholic monarchy, mostly led by Catherine de Medici, the ruthless Queen. I feel smarter for having watched Doctor Who, and not just because I watched Doctor Who.

This is the point at which the story departs from the track a bit. After learning the fate of his friends Nicholas, Gaston and Anne, Steven insists that he is done with Doctor whom he feels could have saved Anne. The TARDIS lands in 20th century London and Steven leaves. In a very touching monologue, the Doctor laments the loss of yet another friend. Hartnell plays this moment perfectly. We really get a sense of how truly lonely he is, saying that they just don’t understand and regrets that they are always in such a hurry to get home. He even briefly reminisces about Susan, whom he hasn’t mentioned in a long time. When Dodo (short for Dorthea), a young girl looking for a telephone, bursts in he sadly tells her to leave because he has no telephone. I have to admit that I really felt for the Doctor during these scenes. His humanity shows through in a way that it doesn’t do very often. In fact, I don’t think we’ve seen this side of him since Susan’s departure. It was a touching moment that was highlighted even more in the next scene.

Steven returns and tells the Doctor they have to leave before the police arrive. Dodo, still in the TARDIS, seems happy to go, claiming she has no family. Her last name is Chaplet and Steven wonders if maybe she is descended from Anne who may have somehow survived. The Doctor notices that she is very similar in appearance to Susan and sounds genuinely happy to have regained friends. Those that travel with him are his family and now Dodo, previously without family has a new one.I really got the sense, for the first time, that the travelers are to be understood as a family. This has been hinted at before, with the Doctor’s reluctance to send Ian and Barbara home and his relationship with Vicki. But in these scenes it’s really made explicit.

For the most part the story is rather ho-hum. As I mentioned, it’s typical Who fare. The closing scenes in London, however, really provide the Doctor with an added depth of character and act as decent introduction to Dodo, our new companion. I truly did believe that Steven was leaving and was pretty surprised by it. I thought maybe they would end the story with the Doctor completely alone. It would have been quite the ending, but the reunion made it better.

25
Feb
10

Story 021: The Daleks’ Master Plan

I finally made it through the epic twelve-part Master Plan. It started strong, went pretty bad, and then finished brilliantly. There’s a lot going on in this story and I think it’s best to talk about it in three parts: The first half of the the story, written by Terry Nation, the Christmas episode (also by Terry Nation), and the second half of the story, written by Dennis Spooner. Warning: This entry is a long one!

Terry Nation

The Terry Nation half of the story is brilliant. I was having the feeling that the story was to be his masterpiece, but that thought was pretty quickly derailed once Spooner took over. First of all, Nation seems to have gotten over whatever was making him write like a moron in The Chase. Picking up where Mission to the Unknown (Dalek Cutaway) left off, the travelers arrive on the Dalek-occupied planet Kembel where rescuers from Earth have gone in search of Kory, our hero from the Dalek Cutaway. The Doctor goes in search of medicine for Steven, still in trouble after being wounded in the hasty departure from Troy. Katarina, still positive that they are in the after-life and in search of the great beyond, is left to care for him. At this point we are exposed to one of the primary characteristics of this story: death. First, an injured Rescuer is killed by a Dalek. He would be the first of many deaths, including a couple of brilliantly done main-character deaths.

The Alien Delegation

Terry Nation, in his last Doctor Who story, put together a great tale. Chen, guardian of the solar system, has Taranium, an element the Daleks need to complete their time destructor, some apparent secret weapon that will allow them to take over the universe. Chen turns out to be a great villain. He is power hungry and, as the story goes on, becomes more and more insane. Along with Chen are other galactic representatives. They include a man that appears to be made of stone, like the Thing, a Mummy, a man in 1950s comic-book space suit, a man with Leaches on his face, one with bumps all over his body, and another one that looks a little like a robot. Apparently this is the greatest brain trust in the universe, but in reality they are all dupes to the Daleks.

The Daleks, in the Terry Nation half, are ruthless. Without hesitation they exterminate anyone that disagrees with them or threatens to get in the way. In this story we meet Dalek Supreme, the Dark Dalek (his only distinguishing feature is his dark color). Dalek Supreme is intense and it seems that even the Daleks fear him. As well they should, considering he has a couple of his own race whacked for failing on a mission.

The Doctor infiltrates the galactic conference and learns of Chen’s delivery of the Taranium (is this perhaps Dalekanium, from the Dalek Invasion of Earth?). He steals the Taranium and off the travelers go, accompanied by Brett, another Earth rescuer. The plan is to go to Earth to warn them of the Dalek Invasion. Unfortunately Chen follows them. On the way to Earth, however, the travelers stop on a prison planet occupied by crazed, violent criminals. The criminals attempt to board their ship, but the Doctor knocks them out, separating himself from the Daleks by saying he does not wish to kill anyone. One of the prisoners had managed to board the ship and quickly takes Katarina hostage.

Brett, the Gang, and TaraniumNow, Katarina. If I had been watching Star Trek (or Lost) she would have been wearing a red shirt and I would have known she was doomed. As I said, she was worthless. She thought they were in the afterlife and the Doctor was a god. She was always prattling on about the perfect place or nirvana or whatever. I think she was still concerned about it when she was taken hostage in the ship’s airlock. Mercifully, she decides to sacrifice herself and opens the airlock door, sucked out into space. It was the first death of a companion, and it was a good one. Plenty of tension, and I’ll have to admit, I wasn’t expecting it. The seconds leading up to the event have existing film, but unfortunately, the film of the actual death has been destroyed. I would have liked to have seen how they did it. The Doctor, after her death, wishes Katarina well. I don’t know why. I was happy to see her go.

Katarina, about to be sucked into space

Chen arrives on Earth before our travelers and brands them as traitors. As a result, Brett is forced to kill his friend and Sara, under Chen’s orders kills Brett. The deaths really mount in the Terry Nation portion of the story. It sets a tense and somber mood that is pretty unique compared to previous stories. At no point has there been this level of violence. As Season 3 has progressed, the show has matured. At this point in the story I was really enjoying it. I was intrigued, I found it exciting. While the secondary characters like Chen and Brett were a little flat, as is typical, the Daleks were at their evil best and I enjoyed both Steven and the Doctor. Even Chen, later in the story, develops some depth. Unfortunately at this point in the story, however, the plot begins to devolve a little bit. This is also the point at which Dennis Spooner took over the writing.

Christmas Episode

The Christmas episode, written by Terry Nation actually follows Spooner’s first episode in the story. The travelers have begun a sequence in which they are running from a so-far unknown pursuer, presumably the Daleks. They land outside of police station in England and on a silent movie set in Hollywood. Hilarity ensues. At the police station one is tempted to think of the scenes in A Hard Day’s Night in which Ringo is arrested and the rest of the Beatles try to get him to the show on time. On the movie set the Doctor has an amusing conversation with a young Bing Crosby, encouraging him to go into music rather than comedy. Charlie Chaplin also makes an appearance. Overall the episode is entertaining The reproduction shows some silent-movie-style title cards. At the end the Doctor (possibly in an ad-lib) wishes all those at home a Happy Christmas. While VERY similar to the absurdity of The Chase, the Christmas Episode was fine on its own, although it doesn’t really fit into the story itself. I give it a thumbs-up as a special episode that aired on Christmas Day, 1965.

Dennis Spooner

The Doctor as Indiana Jones in Ancient Egypt

Spooner takes over for Nation after Sara shoots Brett. And almost immediately the quality of the story drops. At first it’s not too bad. Sara and the Doctor are teleported to another planet by a device that was still in the testing phase. Interestingly, teleportation has not been perfected by the year 4000 when this story takes place. In fact, someone (I forget who) says that it is impossible. Beyond this, however, the episode begins a 4-episode string (including Christmas) of chasing down the travelers. Including what was likely originally intended to be its own story — two episodes in ancient Egypt. These episodes stink. Plain and simple. I felt that it was a rehash of an already poorly conceived concept. What I will mention, though, is the return of the Monk. he has fixed his TARDIS and is back for revenge against the Doctor. Chen attempts to use him to retrieve the taranium. These scenes, infused with humor, are good. But why are they in this serious story? Spooner was unable to maintain the mood that Nation established in the first half of the story and it was really disappointing. The Doctor, disabling the Monk’s TARDIS again, steals the device that allows him to control the TARDIS, navigating it back to Kembel in hopes of stopping the Daleks, once again in possession of the taranium. The arrival back at Kembel got the story back on track.

Chen - On the Road to Insanity

This is the point at which Chen becomes interesting. His desire for power, fully understood by the Daleks, becomes his undoing. He feels that he will be sole ruler of the universe, convinced that the Daleks cannot continue without him. He has no support from the rest of the council (which has been decimated by the murderous Daleks). Yet he gleefully exclaims that he is charge and will rule the universe. While I could not see his face, his voice was delightfully deranged. And over the last two episodes, which were brilliant, he gets crazier and crazier, culminating in the Dalek Supreme’s announcement that their alliance was over. Chen, proclaiming that he is immortal, becomes the latest victim of the truly evil Daleks. In these last episodes, Chen is awesome. So insane, so deranged, so obsessed with his own delusions.

The end of the story, I felt, matched if not exceeded what Nation had initially set up. The Doctor captures and activates the time destructor, the Daleks’ secret weapon. As he and Sara race to the safety of the TARDIS, the time destructor ages them and the planet around them. It has such an effect on Sara that she falls down, dead, turns to a skeleton, and then to dust. The Doctor, falls down but experiences no further effects. The planet ages and dies, the jungle turning to desert. And, lastly, the time has an impact on the Daleks’ casings, rusting them or something, and the mutated creatures within die. The Doctor and Steven examine a dead Dalek and express regret for the violence and the death, mentioning their friends Katarina, Brett, and Sara.

The end of the story was great. The scramble to get back to the TARDIS before the Time destructor could kill them was intense and, as I’ve mentioned, the insanity of Chen. The Daleks never lost their edge in the story and were a truly menacing group of villains. With exception of the downturn throughout the middle, I enjoyed this story a lot. The show is continuing to mature and Season 3, to this point, has been the best so far. If the more serious stories were to emulate what this one did, I think the show would be at its best. The elements of danger and suspense were unlike anything so far. This story really exemplifies what I’ve come to expect from Hartnell’s Doctor, especially considering the more comedic episodes. What I’m left wondering, though, is why the Time Destructor essentially had no effect on the Doctor? And, with Sara gone, how will they fill the open companion character slot? Last time they were left like this we had a quick two-episode story to introduce Vicki. The next story is The Massacre of St. Bartholomew’s Eve, four episodes. And while I don’t expect it to match the seriousness of this one, I’m hoping it’s not too much of a let down.




About These Adventures

This blog exists to document my trip through over 30 seasons of the British science fiction television show Dr. Who. Prior to beginning, I had never seen a single episode of Dr. Who and will be learning the show's mythology and experiencing it all for the first time. I began sometime in July of 2009. Hopefully it doesn't take me over 30 years to reach the end.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 11 other followers

Archive Calendar

September 2017
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930